Super Typhoon Dujuan slams Western Pacific

Typhoon Dujuan nearing peak intensity just before landfall on September 28, 2015

Typhoon Dujuan nearing peak intensity just before landfall on September 28, 2015

Taiwan is one of the most disaster prone areas in the world. Typhoon Dujuan like the many tropical systems before would test the will of the 24.4 million people living on the Island. 

Dujuan began as an open tropical wave of low pressure on September 14, 2015 near the Marshall Islands in the West Central Pacific. After undergoing days of moderate wind shear  the Low Level Closed Circulation (LLCC) remained exposed and removed to the East of the deep convection.

Despite the asymmetry of the tropical wave the Japan Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) finally upgraded the system then located near Guam to a Tropical Depression on September 20, 2015. 

Tropical Depression (Dujuan) looking rather disorganized on September 20, 2015

 

On the same day as being designated Tropical Depression 21L the system was upgraded to Tropical Storm Dujuan by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). Even as a Tropical Storm the system continued to experience moderate vertical wind shear and the LLCC remained fully exposed. Dujuan was also named Jenny by the Philippine Government’s Weather Agency. 

Tropical Storm Dujuan as shown on Infrared Satellite September 29, 2015

Tropical Storm Dujuan as shown on Infrared Satellite September 29, 2015

On September 25, 2015 the JMA upgraded Dujuan to Typhoon status with a forecast track moving Dujuan North West around a deep layer ridge. Dujuan was originally forecast to move South West but that track forecast was adjusted drastically North. The new track suggested a strike to mainland China but later we would realize a southward shift tracking Dujuan over Taiwan. 

Super Typhoon Forecast Track

Super Typhoon Dujuan Forecast Track

 September 26, 2015 Dujuan entered a more favorable environment for intensification. Good divergent outflow along with low wind shear allowed for a stable rate of intensification. The only inhibiting factor was dry air being ingested into the western hemisphere of the Typhoon causing the eye wall to degrade. Dujuan later that day moved into an even better environment and sea surface temperatures of 29 degrees Celcius. The cut off of dry air and an anticyclonic flow aloft allowed Dujuan to rapidly intensify. New one minute sustained wind estimates showed Dujuan with winds of 145mph (Category 4 on the Saffir Simpson Scale). 

Typhoon Dujuan made his first landfall on the Japanese island of Yonaguni with a record wind gust for the island of 181 mph. This was the fourth highest wind gust in Japanese recorded history. Sustained winds of 120mph ranked seventh in recorded history for Japan. 

Typhoon Dujuan's northern Eye Wall ravages the Japanese island of Yonaguni with wind gusts in excess of 175mph

Typhoon Dujuan’s northern Eye Wall ravages the Japanese island of Yonaguni with wind gusts in excess of 175mph

After ravaging the Yaeyama islands Super Typhoon Dujuan set its sights on Taiwan. Making landfall on the afternoon of September 28, 2015 Dujuan lashed Taiwan with sustained winds between 85-120mph and gusts over 150mph. A gust of 152mph at Yilan ranked second highest ever recorded for that location. After lashing Taiwan, Typhoon Dujuan would go on to make landfall the next day on September 29th in China (As I write this) Updates to follow. 

Land falling Typhoon Dujuan as seen on Radar.

Land falling Typhoon Dujuan as seen on Radar.

According to Taiwanese Authorities two people have been killed by Typhoon Dujuan and 324 injured. 

A person is crushed under a fallen tree. It is unknown if the person survived. I have covered the face out of respect and privacy.

A person is crushed under a fallen tree. It is unknown if the person survived. I have covered the face out of respect and privacy.

Additional photos of Typhoon Dujuan’s Impact: 

damage

Damage to a shop after Typhoon Dujuan devastates Taiwan.

The foundation of this home is no match for Dujuan’s storm surge.

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